Slice of Life Story Challenge March 23 -The Joy of Conscious Wordplay




 The Joy Of Conscious Wordplay

Today, I had the opportunity to pander to my poetic passions. After a full day of presenting, I spent today in full writing mode...

Using an extract from Laurie Halse-Anderson’s ‘Speak’ I went in search of some poetic pearls hidden within the narrative on the page.



Using the blackout poetry strategy, I worked my way down the page with a fine line pen blocking in those words I wished to retain. Those words that appealed to my eye and sang to my ears. I looked for flow and continuity of ideas. I wanted my words to exhibit some sense of connection.

Then using a thick black marker I obliterated all the words that had missed selection. What emerged was my found poem. A poem hidden within the original narrative. It appeared like magic. The search for a poem was both engaging and therapeutic. There is much joy to be had in conscious word play.


Here it is, my latest black out poem. Fresh and new within my notebook. 



I peel potatoes
She gives the frozen turkey a hot bath
She hacks at the guts of the turkey
I'm impressed
Cooking means something to her
I finish the potatoes
She pours me orange juice
It burns my scabby lips




Comments

  1. It's strange how we can know about strategies, but then we forget about them if we don't use them. I had forgotten about blackout poetry until you reminded me. Now I must have my students practice it next month. Thank you!

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    1. That is so true. A timely reminder reconnects us with tried and true strategies. i am pleased to have been of service on this occasion. Enjoy!

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  2. I'd never heard of the blackout strategy and enjoyed your post about how it's done. I'm glad you had fun playing with words yesterday and even happier that I had a chance to enjoy your efforts. Thanks!

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    1. Molly, I first became acquainted with this engaging idea from a poet by the name of Austin Kleon who hails from Texas. I had previously used a related strategy I called 'river poems' where you moved down the page circling words and you didn't lift the pen until you reached the bottom of the page. I like black out poetry more, so I moved in that direction. Thanks for stopping by...

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  3. I've seen blackout poetry before, but I've yet to try it myself. I need to change that! Love your poem!!

    Jennifer

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    1. Thanks again Jennifer. Hope you do get to experience the fun one can derive from this poetic strategy.Glad you enjoyed the poem I found hidden in the larger text.

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  4. I love blackout poetry! It's been a while since I've done any myself. You've just inspired me to try again though!
    My blog site is aggiekesler.wordpress.com

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    1. Go for it Aggie. I am well pleased to have provided some small measure of inspiration.

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  5. I really appreciate when writers share their processes - so interesting. Thank you for teaching me about blackout poetry. I will have to try it some time.

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    1. My pleasure Rose. It is a variation of found poetry. I mentioned in another response how I once used a strategy I called, 'river poems', but then Austin Kleon, a Texan poet introduced me to Black Out Poetry and I readily embraced it. Kids love it too. Hope you find a place for it within your poet's heart.

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  6. You familiar with the YA novel Rhyme Schemer by K.A. Holt? Black-out poetry plays a part in the narrative.

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    1. Many thanks Brian. I checked it out. Read the reviews and have ordered it all before 9.00 am! Readers and writers share. Your good work is noted.

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