Slice of Life Story March 8 - A Painted Lady In Our Garden

Welcome Painted Lady

‘Come outside, I’ve got something to show you that you’ll like,’ said Vicki. ‘Meet me near the back gate.’ Ever curious I respond immediately. I get up from the computer and walk to the designated area to meet her.

She then gestures to a lime tree we have growing in a tub near the gate. There, clinging to a new green stem on the lime tree is a butterfly. Vicki is well aware of my long held fascination with butterflies. She smiles, happy to share this discovery. 

‘What kind of butterfly is it? She asks. ‘It’s a Painted Lady.’ I tell her. ‘They’re common in this coastal area.’

The brightness of her colours are a give-away. I am thrilled at this morning discovery. I rush back inside to get my camera. This is a moment worth capturing. For me it is such a joy when these visitors come calling.

When I return the butterfly is still on the lime tree, gently opening and closing her brilliantly coloured wings. When a Painted Lady Butterfly spreads her wings in this fashion, it is not just so we can appreciate her obvious beauty, it’s also a defence mechanism. She is attempting to warn off potential predators. Her bright colours are a warning, particularly to neighbourhood birds, she might be poisonous. 

I am pleased to see this particular butterfly in our garden. It is an indication that our garden environment is healthy. It means we must have the kind of nectar giving plants she needs to feed upon. 

Small moments in a day. Special moments to share and celebrate. Stay as long as you wish Painted Lady. You are welcome any time. 


Comments

  1. What is it about butterflies that make them so wonderful to watch? There's a gentleness (or so it seems) to the floating and landing and sucking of nectar, and a realization that the life span is short but miraculous.
    Kevin

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  2. I believe you are right Kevin. There exists a beauty, fragility and transience to butterflies and all this adds to their unique appeal.

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  3. Beautiful indeed! I felt the same way about the monarchs and queens that chose my potted milkweed plant last spring. Fascinating to watch, especially as they emerged from their chrysalises!

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    1. I waited many years for the Monarchs (or Wanderers as we sometimes call them) to come. I understand your joy. Thanks for dropping by Chris.

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  4. I, too, agree with Kevin that there is something transcendent about noticing butterflies. However small the moment, we are moved.

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    1. It'a all hands up for the wonder we hold for butterflies Tara.

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  5. It will be a while for our swallowtails to return, but I love hearing about your painted lady celebration. I was at our museum yesterday with my youngest granddaughter, and there is an amazing display there of butterflies from all over the world. We loved seeing the pygmy butterfly, the tiniest of them, wondering if we would even notice if we were ever where they live.

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    1. It is wonderful how we anticipate their return Linda. The butterfly collection at the museum sounded like a most informative and spectacular sighting.

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  6. This was lovely. This line, especially, resonates: "For me it is such a joy when these visitors come calling." There's a sense of balance in that line. Something as small as a butterfly is a cherished visitor. We have butterfly bushes outside our home and butterflies hover there most of the summer, but especially in August. It is such a delight. I have taken my camera and phone many times out there to look more closely.

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    1. Mary Ann, you truly appreciate the beauty these delicate creatures provide us. Thank you for insights into your butterfly world.

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  7. Your "Painted Lady" is beautiful. Your slice is rich with relationship--you and Vicki, you and the Painted Lady. And I like your "Small moments in a day. Special moments to share and celebrate."

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  8. Thanks Alice. It is indeed important to appreciate these simple treasurable moments. Thanks for noticing.

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