Slice of Life Story Challenge March 3 - I Talk of A Tree

If I swivel around in my chair as I sit at my computer, I can look out the study window  directly at a most unusual tree. It stands outside my back fence on a strip of land maintained by my local council.  This tree is a Bushy Yate. It is known scientifically as the Eucalyptus Lehmannii (we are all richer for knowing that little factoid) and is a native of Western Australia. It is not a particularly attractive tree. Rugged at best, some might say.
 
It remains unpopular with gardeners as it tends to be a quite messy character –dropping leaves, branches and oversized seed pods on a regular basis. They scatter like shrapnel when struck by a mower. -Zinging pieces in all directions.  Golf courses tend to avoid growing them.
 
For me, the thing that redeems this maligned specimen is its ability to attract native birds. Gang-Gang Cockatoos love them. So too the Lorikeets. Its flowers and fruit are like magnets to birds. Green-yellow flowers form in ball shaped clusters. The seed cases that form from these flowers are extremely hard, spiky and knobbly. They are almost the size of a tennis ball.
 
The Bushy Yate is not a pleasantly shaped tree, although I do like the irregular patterns that form on its trunk. For me, it remains an intriguing tree with redeeming qualities. -Unfashionably beautiful if you like, – a bit like some people.
 
The spiky seed pods of the Bushy Yate
A closer view of these amazing seeds
 
A Gang Gang Cockatoo demolished a seed pod
 
The trunk of the Bushy Yate
 

Comments

  1. I always love the way you showcase stories in your slices over the years. They are a pleasure to read and savor. And the images of the tree and its elements ... a nice start to the day here for me.
    Thanks
    Kevin

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    1. Kevin your feedback is always valued. Glad I was part of a good start to your day fellow writer.

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  2. I loved this!!! I liked how you compared the tree to some peope...as I had been doing the same while reading your words. I used to compare the geode to people...as being plain on the outside...kind of rough...but once opened...a surprise awaits. Your description of the seed pods and how they sound when you mow over them...and how golf courses tend to avoid made me smile. I could go on and on...and yes, the pictures just made it all the better. Thanks so much. Oh, and thanks for your comment on my blog from yesterday as this is my first year doing the slice...and I appreciate the support.

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    1. Jackie, thank you for your response. It's great to have you on board. We are a community of writers, so we must support each other's efforts where possible. Keep being a brave writer!

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  3. One more thing...I am now following your blog so I don't miss anymore interesting posts.

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  4. I have another species of Eucalyptus outside my window at my new house, Alan, & I've noticed that those long pods appear to be food for the numerous squirrels living here. I love your sharing, love all things different in nature. Those seed pods are amazing-would love to have some to touch! And how wonderful to see the gang-gang cockatoos & lorikeets. I see chickadees, sparrows of course, and many magpies around-the most colorful bird right now. Great to hear about your view! And to see it!

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    1. Linda, words and pictures are partners in the dance. Glad you were able to visualize with me.

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  5. Although this character is rather messy, it seems to bring you an interesting array of birds. I love the way you described this. Those are quite unusual seed pods. I can't imagine running over them with a lawn mower. My husband would be picking them up prior to mowing.

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    1. You're right Elsie, the array of birds and the front row seat I have are priceless. I have a lot to be thankful for with my great location. Thank you for your positive response.

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  6. Alan,
    I jokingly call my husband "The Tree Whisperer" as he is fascinated by trees. Every year I wait to see what trees he will be adding to our homestead. It's kind of a joke when visitors come that if they aren't careful he will take them on a tree tour. I found this post interesting as the tree is so different from anything I know. I found it interesting to hear how it attracts particular birds. How lucky you are to have such an interesting view right outside your window.

    Cathy

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    1. I like the idea of the Tree Whisperer, Cathy. A man after my own heart. I am indeed lcuky to have this great spot to look out over as I write.

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